Celebrate Organic Month: The Process of Making Organic Jasmine Green Tea

  • September 27, 2017
  • valerie

jasmine green teaOne of the most intriguing of teas that often prompts curious tea drinkers to ask us: How does Jasmine Green tea get that floral flavor? Is it made of flowers? Is it a perfume? Essential oils? This complex and delicate green tea closes out our Organic Month tea exploration, and we’ll help answer the question: How does that tasty floral flavor get into my cup of green tea?

Jasmine scented tea has been produced in China for centuries. It is famous for its fragrant, sweet essence along with hosting the benefits of energizing green tea.

Our Jasmine Green tea comes from China, beginning with organic tea gardens with rich history in tea cultivation. Tea leaves are hand plucked and then taken to the factory to start processing. The green tea leaves are then withered to remove moisture. During this time, more developed flavors are being established by a natural chemical change within the leaf. After withering, the tea leaves are pan-fired in a large rotating cylinder at high heat to halt oxidation.

Before the drying phase is complete, the tea is scented. To scent the tea, the jasmine flowers must be freshly picked and not yet bloomed. The elegant buds are selected and removed from the plant in the morning and then added in layers with the tea leaves. Overnight, the buds open and bloom, imparting their floral fragrance into the tea leaves. The flowers are then removed, so no buds remain in the tea, and the scented tea is then dried completely. Once dried, the final product moves on to be placed in tea bags or loose leaf packaging, then to your tea cup.

Shop Jasmine Green teas.

Visit our How It’s Made interactive tool to click through various tea types and explore the steps in processing.

Organic Month may be coming to an end, but we celebrate organic tea all year ‘round. Follow our blog and keep up with us on social media for product information, tips, recipes, and more

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